Home is where the diet starts.

Oh dear, oh dear, oh dear. Two weeks All Inclusive, need I say more? And it was good All Inclusive too, so by the middle of the second week we’d managed to cut back to a five course breakfast and not more than two hours each for lunch and dinner. In fact, by the time we came home, we had found the need to entertain ourselves between meals, I mean,just the odd half hour, nothing excessive, obviously and we’d pretty much cut out snacks altogether- mostly. So it’s cereal and juice for breakfast for the foreseeable future; cottage cheese for lunch and salad for dinner. And no alcohol. Oh Happy Day…

So there we were on the island of Cyprus, where Othello met his comeuppance, and Aphrodite met Adonis and where Margaret and her loved one escaped  to avoid at least part of the English winter. The first couple of days were a bit English, weatherwise, but we’d seen the forecasts and taken wellies and waterproofs, so we didn’t suffer too much.

 

But it was a bit blustery. It felt weird with palm trees and scarves ...
But it was a bit blustery. It felt weird with palm trees and scarves …
A bit grey but we walked along the coastal path from our hotel into Paphos , about 2-3 miles at most, and made it before the rain really got going.
A bit grey but we walked along the coastal path from our hotel into Paphos , about 2-3 miles at most, and made it before the rain really got going.

 

As the rain started, I suggested we went in the fort for a bit of historical background and to shelter from the rain. Pity it had hardly any roof!

A locked door to a staircase leading nowhere, hmmm.
A locked door to a staircase leading nowhere, hmmm.
The fort on the harbour at Paphos.
The fort on the harbour at Paphos.
Don't be fooled by the bright light at the top, believe me, it wasn't sunshine.
Don’t be fooled by the bright light at the top, believe me, it wasn’t sunshine.

 

I might add, we got the bus back.

Fortunately, we’d had the foresight to book a hire car for the middle part of the holiday and spent a fair bit of time exploring. (Exploring is a euphemism for “getting lost” We do it all the time.) So we missed a junction at one point and found ourselves on a deserted beach called Avdimou and it was, if a little cool, very lovely in a barren sort of way.

Finding our way back to the road we should have been on, we were following signs for Episkopi, which was a strangely familiar name because there was and still is a British military base there from which we used to hear BFPO broadcasts on the radio when we were children. It brought back a lot of memories of old songs, the BBC ligth Programme and all sorts of long forgotten memories. A thoroughly enjoyable trip into the land of nostalgia, the Navy Lark, Saturday Club, .

And we also found the Temple of Apollo Hylates. (Look him/it up, it’s one of those new religion takes over old stories.) But the ruins were really impressive and we had a jolly hour and a half until the rain turned horizontal and we made a run for shelter.

20150114_113550 20150114_114246 20150114_114238

You will gather this was one of the damp days, and pretty cold too. Was regretting taking mainly sandals.
You will gather this was one of the damp days, and pretty cold too. Was regretting taking mainly sandals.

As has happened on previous occasions, I found myself seeing patterns everywhere but when I saw the mosaics at Kourion, it was kid in a sweet shop time again. Just look at these, all at least 2000 years old.

Samsung mini Jan 2015 1092 Samsung mini Jan 2015 1089 Samsung mini Jan 2015 1090 Samsung mini Jan 2015 1093 Samsung mini Jan 2015 1094 Samsung mini Jan 2015 1097

Anyway, that holiday is now over and we are back in the grey and damp of and English winter. They are threatening us with snow, although not as bad as I see forecast for the US, so my sympathies for all of you awaiting the blast of Juno.

But I woke up on my first day home to realise that it was Diva Day again. A duotangle this week, using Chebucto and Copada. The former is new to me and I got stuck on keeping it regular and geometrically precise, which is how it ended up as the string on my first attempt, with Copada inside. Going back to it after a few hours, I disliked it less but it still lacks that something, don’t know what. So I had another go and used a giant Copada in the background. By that time, I’d had a look at what other people had done and it was clear that the more organic ones were more to my taste, so I tried to free up my hand and stop worrying about symmetry. It sort of works but then I had this idea. Do some black infills. Now why didn’t that little voice remind me how awful it always looks when i try to fill in a black background? I mean, I rarely use Hollibaugh because of that and it’s taken me ages to conquer NZeppel but no, there I was, brush pen in hand, making a splodgy mess and kidding myself it would look OK.

So here they both are. Neither of them quite works but they both NEARLY do. Ah well, onward and upward…

SAM_7938 SAM_7939

 

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11 thoughts on “Home is where the diet starts.

  1. I think they both work quite well! I love the first one and the second kind of reminds me of a stage with the curtain about to open. Really neat! Your photos are also really lovely, thanks for inviting us along 🙂

  2. Both of your Tiles are very creative. I love the way you use patterns in various resolutions, and combinations. Great use of Black. Love your Post. I’ve enjoyed your vacation dialogs. Your writing style is delightful and so enjoyable. Love the Photos.

  3. I like the starkness of the first one—–just the facts, ma’am. How many squid were used to produce all the ink to color in your black background for the second one? 😉

    We visited Cyprus in 2005/ (I may be repeating myself from last week’s challenge?) For us Americans (united Statesers,) Roman and Greek ruins and even medieval castles blow our minds. Did you visit Richard the Lionhearted’s castle near Kourian? Nice place to visit, but I wouldn’t want to live there. Interesting security system—-holes over the entrance from which to pour boiling oil on unwanted visitors. I wasn’t a tangler when we were in Cyprus. (I don’t think it had been invented yet ;-), but I can see how those mosaic floors being excavated at Kourion might have one’s pen hand twitching. It looks like you didn’t have wonderful weather. We were there in early July. No rain, but pretty insufferable heat. Thanks for sharing your travel adventures. As you know, I’m a wandering lass myself.

  4. You are much to hard on yourself! I think both tiles are beautiful in a quite different way. Thanks for sharing your story and photo’s.

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